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in El Dorado County

The Fighting Fentanyl in EDC campaign addresses the rise of fentanyl substance use and fentanyl-related overdoses locally, statewide, and nationally. This campaign provides the community with easily-accessible information regarding fentanyl, substance use disorders (SUD), and how to respond when someone overdoses. El Dorado COPE has compiled information regarding the signs of an overdose (OD), testing for fentanyl, and knowing your rights. This website page also acts as a directory of SUD-related services in El Dorado County and provides agency information for SUD services, Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT), free Narcan distribution sites, and harm reduction services.

THE CAMPAIGN

THE FIGHTING FENTANYL CAMPAIGN

ABOUT FENTANYL

ABOUT

“Over 150 people die every day from overdoses related to synthetic opioids like fentanyl.”

View the California Overdose Surveillance Dashboard:

Learn how to use fentanyl test strips:

40xs

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that can be:

stronger than heroin

100xs

stronger than morphine

you don’t always know what/how much fentanyl is in your pills/drugs.

Where do we see fentanyl?

  • Alone as a “crumbly” powder

  • Adulterated in heroin (very little heroin in EDC)

  • Illicit pills

  • Cocaine and methamphetamines – driving increase in stimulant overdose deaths

Fentanyl in El Dorado County...

FentanylInEDC.jpeg

Two types of fentanyl: pharmaceutical fentanyl & illicitly manufactured fentanyl (IMF) 

Pharmaceutical fentanyl is prescribed by doctors to treat severe pain. Most recent cases of fentanyl-related overdose are linked to illicitly manufactured fentanyl. It's often added to other drugs because of its extreme potency. This makes it cheaper and more powerful, addictive, and dangerous.

Rainbow Fentanyl –fentanyl pills and powder comes in a variety of bright colors, shapes, and sizes. (www.DEA.gov)

What is IMF?

  • Synthetic opioid

  • Not detected on most urine drug screens

  • Significant variation in type, potency & purity which increases risk of overdose

  • Repeated use leads to accumulation in adipose tissue –slowly leaves fat stores 

Street names for IMF include:

•Apache

•Dance Fever

•Friend

•Goodfellas

•Jackpot

•Murder 8

•Tango & Cash

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KEY TERMS + VOCABULARY

KEY TERMS

What is Stigma?

"A strong feeling of disapproval that most people in a society have about something, especially when this is unfair" 

Cambridge Dictionary

"An attribute, behavior, or reputation that is socially discrediting, and substance-related problems appear to be particularly susceptible to stigma." 

International Journal on Drug Policy

  • MORE than just Stereotyping 

    • Ideas and attitudes that generalize and label groups 

  • MORE than just Prejudice 

    • Endorsing and promoting harmful beliefs within stereotypes 

  • MORE than just Discrimination 

    • Practices and behaviors that promote inequity toward labeled groups

Stigma on 3 levels 

  1. Structural: laws, regulations, politics

    • EX: State health agency boards who make decisions, polices, and laws with no representation of individuals with lived experience 

  2. Public: attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of individuals and groups 

    • EX: Neighborhood perspectives regarding the presence of drug activity

  3. Self-Stigma: internalized negative stereotypes

    • EX: Believing that you’re not worth treatment

Stigma Impacts Recovery: 

  • Reduces willingness to seek professional support: 

    • Fear of being looked down upon, stereotyped, etc. 

  • Causes reluctance + aversion to attend treatment 

  • Limits access to healthcare, housing, aftercare, community support, + employment

Impacts on Stigmatized Populations:

  • Increase in adverse outcomes 

  • Diminished self-esteem 

  • Affects personal relationships at a time they are needed the most

  • Increases involvement in risky behaviors

What is Harm Reduction?

"Harm reduction is a set of practical strategies and ideas aimed at reducing negative consequences associated with drug use. Harm Reduction is also a movement for social justice built on a belief in, and respect for, the rights of people who use drugs."

-National Harm Reduction Coalition 

Examples of Harm Reduction:

  • Overdose Prevention

  • Syringe exchange

  • Disease testing

  • Disposal containers

  • NARCAN/Naloxone training

  • Referral to treatment + resources 

Check out the local Sierra Harm Reduction Coalition in EDC:

​Some Principles of Harm Reduction:

 

1. Accepts, for better or worse, that licit and illicit drug use is part of our world and chooses to work to minimize its harmful effects rather than simply ignore or condemn them

​2. Calls for the non-judgmental, non-coercive provision of services and resources to people who use drugs and the communities in which they live in order to assist them in reducing attendant harm

​3. Recognizes that the realities of poverty, class, racism, social isolation, past trauma, sex-based discrimination, and other social inequalities affect both people’s vulnerability to and capacity for effectively dealing with drug-related harm

​4. Does not attempt to minimize or ignore the real and tragic harm and danger that can be associated with illicit drug use

YOUR RIGHTS

THE GOOD SAMARITAN
LAW

California’s 911 Good Samaritan Law provides limited protection from arrest, charge and prosecution for people who seek emergency medical assistance at the scene of a suspected drug overdose.

Read the Good Samaritan Law on the California Legislature's website here: 

Code: HSC | Section: 1799.102.

When calling 911 services, say:

**Give Location**

"We have a person down. They are not breathing. Suspect an overdose."

 

This will activate the Good Samaritan Law​ and your protections

Do NOT interfere with first responders.

Step Back.

You will be risking your Good Samaritan Law protections otherwise

Witnesses are protected even if they...

 

  • Are under the influence of drugs 

  • In possession of small amounts of drugs 

  • In possession of drug paraphernalia 

SIGNS OF AN OVERDOSE

LOOK OUT FOR

Are they High or Overdosing?

(on opioids)

    a. Are they responsive?

    b. Are they breathing?

If yes to both, they’re just high

Here are some things to look for:

  • Small, constricted “pinpoint pupils”

  • Falling asleep or losing consciousness

  • Slow, weak, or no breathing

  • Choking or gurgling sounds

  • Limp body

  • Cold and/or clammy skin

  • Discolored skin (especially lips & nails)

    • Caucasian: Blue/Purple

    • BIPOC: Grey-ish 

"Recognizing the signs of opioid overdose can save
a life."

WHAT TO DO IF SOMEONE OVERDOSES

(on opioids)

WHAT TO DO

STEP ONE: Assess + Stimulate 

  1.  Assess yourself and the situation:

    1.  Are you able to assist at the moment?

    2.  Is it safe for you to assist? ​​

  2. Stimulate:

    1.  VERBAL: YELL. Explain what you're doing before doing it.

      1.  Ex: "Hey! Are you okay? Can you show me how you're doing?

    2.  PHYSICAL: Arm pinch, sternum rub, etc. 

 

 STEP TWO: Calling 911

  1.  Give minimal information: 

    1.  Location ​

    2.  Say "We have a person down. They are not breathing. Suspect an overdose."

      1.  This will ACTIVATE the Good Samaritan Law​

      2.  Do NOT interfere with first responders, step back. You will be risking your Good Samaritan Law protections otherwise

  2.  If you're by yourself:​

    1.  Call 911 

    2.  Retrieve and Administer NARCAN/Naloxone

    3. Preform RESUCE BREATHING

  3.  If you're in a group:

    1.  Delegate roles​

    2. Point to someone and say "Call 9ll"

    3. YELL out "Does anyone have NARCAN/Naloxone?"

      1. Retrieve and Administer NARCAN/Naloxone

    4. Preform RESCUE BREATHING

 

 STEP THREE: Administering NARCAN/Naloxone

  1.  Nasal NARCAN Tip:​

    1.  Do NOT test (one dose per bottle)​

    2.  3-5 minutes to work 

  2. Intramuscular Naloxone Tip:​

    1.  Draw ALL fluid into the needle​

    2.  Inject needle straight into the upper side of the arm or middle side of the thigh (do not inject into the butt)

  3. Administer a 2nd dose of NARCAN/Naloxone if...

    • The person is not awake in 2.5-3 minutes ​

    • If the person stops breathing agai

 

STEP FOUR: Put the person in the Recovery Position

  1.  Lay them on their side with the bottom arm extended out, the top arm under the head, and the top knee supporting them on their side​

 

 STEP FIVE: Stay with the person until emergency assistance arrives

  1.  If you must leave, leave the person in THE RECOVERY POSITION 

How to administer NARCAN/
Naloxone... 
  1. Remove NARCAN/Naloxone spray from the box
  2. Peel Back the tab with the circle to open 
  3. Place your thumb on the bottom and your middle/index fingers on either side of the top
  4. Tilt the persons head back and support behind the neck with your hand 
  5. Insert entirely into the nostril and press plunger to administer the full dose

Fentanyl is not Narcan resistant...
it just might take a little more Narcan

Watch a YouTube video...

How to preform Rescue Breathing... 
  1. Place face shield **optional**
  2. Tilt head back, lift chin, & pinch nose
  3. Give one breath into the mouth every 5 seconds 
  4. Administer a second dose of NARCAN if:
    • If there is no breathing after 2-3 minutes
    • If the person stops breathing again
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SERVICES IN EDC

SERVICES

Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Services

in El Dorado County

SUD Services are drug and alcohol counseling, MAT, detoxification, and inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation.

EDC Behavioral Health SUDS 

1-800-929-1955

929 Spring St, Placerville, CA

1900 Lake Tahoe Blvd,

South Lake Tahoe, CA

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(530) 626-9240

2844 Coloma St, Placerville, CA

(530) 344-7633

484 Pleasant Valley Rd #4, Diamond Springs

(530) 307-1066

2201 South Avenue, South Lake Tahoe, CA

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT)

in El Dorado County

​Medication Assisted Treatment is the use of medications, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, to provide a “whole-patient” approach to the treatment of substance use disorders. 

ED 24/7 + MMC CARES

(530) 621-7965

1045 Marshall Way, Placerville, CA

(530) 543-5623

2201 South Avenue, South Lake Tahoe, CA

(530) 387-4321

5168 Honpie Road, Placerville, CA **Right off Red Hawk Parkway**

STEPS Program

(530) 556-2018

3104 Ponte Morino Drive, Suite 100, Cameron Park

4212 Missouri Flat Road, Placerville

NARCAN/Naloxone FREE

In El Dorado County

FREE NARCAN

530-307-1066

2170 South Avenue, South Lake Tahoe, CA

  • Emergency Department. Walk-ins welcomed

  • At clinics please ask your provider.

(530) 387-4185

5168 Honpie Road, Placerville, CA **Right off Red Hawk Parkway**

  • Please call and make an appointment for Narcan pickup and a quick training

STEPS Program

(530) 556-2018

3104 Ponte Morino Drive, Suite 100, Cameron Park

4212 Missouri Flat Road, Placerville

  • Location: All clinic locations 

  • Walk-ins welcomed

(530) 621-7965

1045 Marshall Way, Placerville, CA

  • Locations: Emergency Department or Marshall CARES 

  • Patients, family, friends

(530) 212-0279

Delivery Only

  • Free Narcan + Fentanyl Testing Strip Delivery!!

  • Call or text!!

  • We deliver!! 

(530) 573-3185

1000 Rufus Allen Blvd, South Lake Tahoe, CA

  • Walk-ins welcomed

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(530) 600-2822

1137 Emerald Bay Rd, South Lake Tahoe, CA

  • Street Health & Harm Reduction Program (SHARP)

Definition of  NARCAN / Naloxone: 

  

Naloxone is a medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) designed to rapidly reverse opioid overdose.

The medication can be given into the nose, into the muscle, under the skin, or via intravenous injection.

Harm Reduction Services

in El Dorado County

Sierra Harm Reduction Coalition (SHRC) services provide positive reinforcement to catalyze change for individuals using drugs in the unique community of EDC.

 

Their commitment is to scrape away the barriers created by stigma & discrimination towards drug users.

Their services include:

  • Safer Using Supplies

  • Syringe Collection and Disposal

  • FREE Narcan Distribution + Fentanyl Testing Supplies

  • Disposal containers

  • Training and Education 

  • Case Managment

  • Referrals to essential services 

HOTLINE

(530) 212-0279

CAMPAIGN GRAPHICS

GRAPHICS

Campaign Brochures

**for best at home printing, print from web browser**

Campaign Brochure (English)

Campaign Brochure (Spanish)

COMING SOON...

Campaign Wallet Cards

**for best at home printing, print from web browser**

Campaign Social Media Sets

Additional Graphics

GLOSSARY + CITATIONS

GLOSSARY

Campaign Glossary: 

  • BUPRENORPHINE

  • FENTANYL:

    • a synthetic opioid narcotic analgesic with pharmacological action like morphine that is administered transdermally as a skin patch and in the form of its citrate where it is administered orally or by injection.(as it relates to medicinally purposes) (Merriam-Webster Dictionary)

  • HARM REDUCTION: 

    • Harm reduction is a set of practical strategies and ideas aimed at reducing negative consequences associated with drug use. Harm Reduction is also a movement for social justice built on a belief in, and respect for, the rights of people who use drugs.(National Harm Reduction Coalition) 

    • Harm reduction incorporates a spectrum of strategies that includes safer use, managed use, abstinence, meeting people who use drugs “where they’re at,” and addressing conditions of use along with the use itself. Because harm reduction demands that interventions and policies designed to serve people who use drugs reflect specific individual and community needs, there is no universal definition of or formula for implementing harm reduction. (National Harm Reduction Coalition) 

  • MEDICATION ASSISTED TREATMENT (MAT): 

  • METHADONE:

    • Methadone is a medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) as a medication-assisted treatment (MAT), as well as for pain management. When taken as prescribed, methadone is safe and effective. Methadone helps individuals achieve and sustain recovery and to reclaim active and meaningful lives. Methadone is one component of a comprehensive treatment plan, which includes counseling and other behavioral health therapies to provide patients with a whole-person approach. (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, SAMHSA)

  • NARCAN/Naloxone:

    • Naloxone is a medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) designed to rapidly reverse opioid overdose. The medication can be given by intranasal spray (into the nose), intramuscular (into the muscle), subcutaneous (under the skin), or intravenous injection. (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, SAMHSA)

  •   OPIOID OVERDOSE:

    • Opioid intake to the point of respiratory depression.

  • RECOVERY: 

    • A process of change through which individuals improve their health and wellness, live self-directed lives, and strive to reach their full potential. (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, SAMHSA)

      • Guiding Principle: Hope, the belief that these challenges and conditions can be overcome, is the foundation of recovery.

  • STIGMA:

    • A strong feeling of disapproval that most people in a society have about something, especially when this is unfair. (Cambridge Dictionary)

    • An attribute, behavior, or reputation that is socially discrediting, and substance-related problems appear to be particularly susceptible to stigma. (International Journal on Drug Policy)

  • SUBOXONE:

    • ​SUBOXONE (buprenorphine and naloxone) Sublingual Film® (CIII) is a prescription medicine used to treat opioid addiction in adults and is part of a complete treatment program that also includes counseling and behavioral therapy. (Suboxone)

  •  SUBSTANCE USE DISORDER (SUD): 

    • A Substance Use Disorder (SUD) is a dependence on alcohol, street drugs or prescriptions medications for non-medical purposes.

    • Substance use disorders occur when the recurrent use of alcohol and/or drugs causes clinically significant impairment, including health problems, disability, and failure to meet major responsibilities at work, school, or home. (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, SAMHSA)

  • SUD SERVICES:

    • Substance Use Disorder Services are drug and alcohol counseling, medication assisted treatment, detoxification and inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation.

Campaign Citations:

“Buprenorphine.” Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration , SAMHSA, 27 Sept. 2022, https://www.samhsa.gov/medication-assisted-treatment/medications-counseling-related-conditions/buprenorphine.

“Dea Warns of Brightly-Colored Fentanyl Used to Target Young Americans.” DEA, United States Drug Enforcement Administration, 30 Aug. 2022, https://www.dea.gov/press-releases/2022/08/30/dea-warns-brightly-colored-fentanyl-used-target-young-americans.

 

“DOPE Project Monthly Overdose Prevention & Naloxone Administration Training.” DOPE Project, 16 Aug. 2022.

“Fentanyl.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fentanyl. Accessed 25 Oct. 2022.

 

“Fentanyl Facts.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 23 Feb. 2022, https://www.cdc.gov/stopoverdose/fentanyl/index.html

 

"Fentanyl and Overdose Prevention." Jay, D, Marshall Medical Center. [PPT]. 2022

“For Opioid Dependence: SUBOXONE (Buprenorphine and Naloxone) Sublingual Film® (CIII).” Patient Information for SUBOXONE® (Buprenorphine and Naloxone) Sublingual Film (CIII), Indivior PLC, https://www.suboxone.com/

"The Good Samaritan Law." Ewing, Tom, Sierra Harm Reduction Coalition. [PDF]. 2021

“Good Samaritan Laws.” County of Santa Clara Behavioral Health Services , County of Santa Clara , https://bhsd.sccgov.org/information-resources/opioid-overdose-prevention-project/good-samaritan-laws 

"Know Your Rights." Ewing, Tom, Sierra Harm Reduction Coalition. [PDF]. 2021

 

"Mat Medications, Counseling, and Related Conditions." Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, SAMHSA, 2022, March 4. https://www.samhsa.gov/medication-assisted-treatment/medications-counseling-related-conditions#medications-used-in-mat

"Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders." Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, SAMHSA, 2022, November 22. https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disorders

“Methadone.” Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration , SAMHSA, 27 Sept. 2022.